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Greno Woods
Sheffield, England, S35 8RS
United Kingdom

07927871192

At Howl we specialise in journeying skills, the Bushcraft we practice and teach is that of the traveler. There is a wonderful simplicity that comes from taking a trip in the outdoors, a pragmatism gleaned from necessity. We draw from this experience in the field to teach a set of skills and knowledge based in expedience and realism, skills that actually get used while outdoors. We provide an insight into the Natural world, opening up a vast array of natural resources and knowledge to help you travel with less reliance on the contents of your rucksack: it’s what you carry in your mind that matters.

 

 We teach these practical skills in a friendly and open way, our hope being to enable you to make your adventures into the Great Outdoors memorable and enjoyable. We'll help you cultivate a positive attitude, a confidence in yourself, and a connection with the natural world through which you travel.

We promote the utmost respect for the environment, the ability to pass unnoticed through the woods brings with it a deeper understanding of the wilderness, and our part in it. It is this philosophy which forms the very core of our work.

We promote the utmost respect for the environment, the ability to pass unnoticed through the woods brings with it a deeper understanding of the wilderness, and our part in it. It is this philosophy which forms the very core of our work.

Knots for Bushcraft: Videos in the Rain

Howl Bushcraft Blog

Knots for Bushcraft: Videos in the Rain

Jamie Dakota

During our recent Bushcraft and the Canoe Day we covered several knots and their applications. In general we keep things simple in bushcraft, knowing a few choice knots that can be widely applied is better than having a different knot for every conceivable situation. 

I owe a thank you to Nicole for filming the sections and allowing me to publish the video here.

To tie a tarp I use the Evenk Hitch to anchor one side of the ridgeline; this knot is also used anywhere that I wish to anchor something to a fixed point, being quick to tie and quick to release it works well when tying a canoe to a bank.

Next we tension the Ridgeline using the Taut Tarp Hitch.

An Alternative to this would the simplest version of the Truckers Hitch; this knot relies on creating a pulley system by pulling rope along itself under great friction. As such I would recommend using a cord with a high resistance to heat and abrasion. 

Lastly we have the Slippery guyline hitch, tied around a log as opposed to a peg. This is a very useful knot allowing you to adjust the tension after it has been tied. 

And there we go, a few knots which I use regularly in the outdoors. We featured a couple more during the day course, along with many other key expedition skills. And we spent the afternoon paddling around too! If you'd like to learn about the one day workshop, click here

We stock a full set of tailor made guylines in the online shop. 

As always I'd love to hear what you think, are there any knots that you use instead? 

All the best

Jamie